September122014

Governor George Wallace meeting with men who won the office he sought (unsuccessfully) on several different occasions. Of all these men Wallace had an interesting relationship with Nixon above all others. It was Wallace’s standing as a third party candidate in 1968 that cost Hubert Humphrey the White House and gave Nixon his narrow victory. Wallace’s candidature robbed Humphrey of five states in the “solid south” and opened Nixon’s eyes to winning conservative voters in the old confederacy. Lingering bitterness of the civil war kept the south voting for democratic candidates at all levels of government on almost all occasions. Nixon adopted many of Wallace’s policies on issues such as bussing to win southern voters to the party of Abraham Lincoln. Whatever about Barry Goldwater being the father of modern US conservatism-it was Wallace wound the clock which chimed for more acceptable candidates such as Nixon, Reagan and Bush. 

September32014
Rev. Jesse Jackson with Governor George Wallace. 

Rev. Jesse Jackson with Governor George Wallace. 

August302014





The Irish Times likes to trot out the idea that John Redmond was a constitutionalist to his core, a view regularly propagated courtesy of John Bruton. This year when the spotlight is once again on Redmond his less than constitutional credentials are unsurprisingly glossed over. It must be remembered that during the Venezuelan Crisis (1895), Redmond was writing to President Grover Cleveland assuring him of Irish support if the United States went to war against Great Britain (“England’s difficulty” and all that). Hardly the actions of a loyal member of the British parliament? More importantly in this centenary year is Redmond’s role as a gun-runner, which seems to have been wholly neglected by official Ireland. It is a fact of history that Redmond was amongst those who sought and arranged for the importation arms on behalf of the Irish Volunteers, whom he knew would face not just their opponents in Ulster, but elements of the British Army seeking to forestall any measure of Irish freedom. Whatever about his aristocratic aloofness Redmond’s patriotism and ability to utilise circumstances to achieve his aim, a united Ireland with its own parliament in Dublin, should not be diminished by those trying to derive from the fact that his methods were not always wholesome or even remotely constitutional.
The Irish Times likes to trot out the idea that John Redmond was a constitutionalist to his core, a view regularly propagated courtesy of John Bruton. This year when the spotlight is once again on Redmond his less than constitutional credentials are unsurprisingly glossed over. It must be remembered that during the Venezuelan Crisis (1895), Redmond was writing to President Grover Cleveland assuring him of Irish support if the United States went to war against Great Britain (“England’s difficulty” and all that). Hardly the actions of a loyal member of the British parliament? More importantly in this centenary year is Redmond’s role as a gun-runner, which seems to have been wholly neglected by official Ireland. It is a fact of history that Redmond was amongst those who sought and arranged for the importation arms on behalf of the Irish Volunteers, whom he knew would face not just their opponents in Ulster, but elements of the British Army seeking to forestall any measure of Irish freedom. Whatever about his aristocratic aloofness Redmond’s patriotism and ability to utilise circumstances to achieve his aim, a united Ireland with its own parliament in Dublin, should not be diminished by those trying to derive from the fact that his methods were not always wholesome or even remotely constitutional.
August242014
diariesofaglaswegianoddity:

awwww-cute:

Our Husky Stark seemed a little overheated after his walk this morning, so we decided to tried something out. We regret it now because it is next to impossible to get him to come out


ADORABLE

diariesofaglaswegianoddity:

awwww-cute:

Our Husky Stark seemed a little overheated after his walk this morning, so we decided to tried something out. We regret it now because it is next to impossible to get him to come out

ADORABLE

6AM
tfootielover:

i laughed out loud :)))

tfootielover:

i laughed out loud :)))

(Source: catastrofe, via mrjason300)

August112014
Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery. Gladstone’s tragic successor as Premier and Liberal leader: March 1894-June 1895. Rosebery entered political life with great promise, he was courted by both Gladstone and Disraeli. Rosebery as leader of the “Lib Imps” (Liberal Imperialists) found himself at odds with the Gladstonians in cabinet led by William Harcourt. After he lost an army supply vote Rosebery resigned as Prime Minister in favour of Salisbury, hoping to win when parliament was dissolved. This trick failed and the Tory/Liberal Unionists won the General Election. After his Premership Rosebery became an increasingly marginalised and isolated figure within the Liberal Party-differing with his Commons colleagues over a variety of issues such as: Home Rule, Lords Reform and The Peoples Budget, 

Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery. Gladstone’s tragic successor as Premier and Liberal leader: March 1894-June 1895. Rosebery entered political life with great promise, he was courted by both Gladstone and Disraeli. Rosebery as leader of the “Lib Imps” (Liberal Imperialists) found himself at odds with the Gladstonians in cabinet led by William Harcourt. After he lost an army supply vote Rosebery resigned as Prime Minister in favour of Salisbury, hoping to win when parliament was dissolved. This trick failed and the Tory/Liberal Unionists won the General Election. After his Premership Rosebery became an increasingly marginalised and isolated figure within the Liberal Party-differing with his Commons colleagues over a variety of issues such as: Home Rule, Lords Reform and The Peoples Budget, 

August22014
I missed the actual date (2 July, 1914), but it would be remiss of me to fail to note the centenary of Joseph Chamberlain’s death. If I was to have a pantheon of heroes, Chamberlain would certainly have a place within it. He began his career as the radical mayor of Birmingham, where his reforms led to the city becoming one of the best places to live anywhere in the world. His time as mayor laid the foundation for what became known as the ‘Chamberlain machine’, which secured his electoral domination of the city and sparked the professionalisation of politics within the United Kingdom. Chamberlain became a Member of Parliament in 1874, when he was elected as a Liberal. His experience as a machine politician led him to be a key player in establishing the National Liberal Federation, the first professional party political machine in the United Kingdom. Chamberlain’s radicalism led him to launch the so-called ‘Unauthorised Programme’ during the 1885 General Election campaign. This was hugely popular amongst recently enfranchised landed labourers who voted Liberal inspired by the promise of “three acres and a cow.” The programme was credited with securing the Liberal victory in that election and Chamberlain was made a cabinet minister by William Gladstone. Chamberlain broke with Gladstone over Home Rule for Ireland shortly after the election, a committed imperialist he believed the policy would lead to the collapse of the British Empire. Upon breaking with Gladstone he formed the Liberal Unionist Federation, a collection of anti-Home Rule Whigs and radicals. From 1886 the Liberal Unionists supported Lord Salisbury’s Conservative government, eventually the party would serve in coalition with the Tories from 1895-1906. Chamberlain served as Colonial Secretary where he unsuccessfully promoted the idea of an Imperial Federation. His time in office dimmed his radicalism as he became more indulgent in affairs of the Empire. Not being content with splitting the Liberals, Chamberlain did the same to the Tories in 1903 over tariff reform. His desire for “Imperial preference” in trade split the Conservative and Unionist coalition, resulting in the 1906 Liberal landslide. At the point when it looked like Chamberlain would capture control of the Tories (the Liberal Unionists had more or less become part and parcel of the Conservative Party) in 1906, he suffered a debilitating stroke-effectively ending his political career. Both his sons, Austen and Neville enjoyed successful political careers. Austen was denied the Premiership as he was too cautious in trying to avoid his father’s reputation as a splitter but did serve in several high offices, such as Foreign Secretary and Chancellor of the Exchequer. Neville entered politics late but managed to become Prime Minister, his time in that office was blighted by his association with the appeasement of Hitler.  

I missed the actual date (2 July, 1914), but it would be remiss of me to fail to note the centenary of Joseph Chamberlain’s death. If I was to have a pantheon of heroes, Chamberlain would certainly have a place within it. He began his career as the radical mayor of Birmingham, where his reforms led to the city becoming one of the best places to live anywhere in the world. His time as mayor laid the foundation for what became known as the ‘Chamberlain machine’, which secured his electoral domination of the city and sparked the professionalisation of politics within the United Kingdom. Chamberlain became a Member of Parliament in 1874, when he was elected as a Liberal. His experience as a machine politician led him to be a key player in establishing the National Liberal Federation, the first professional party political machine in the United Kingdom. Chamberlain’s radicalism led him to launch the so-called ‘Unauthorised Programme’ during the 1885 General Election campaign. This was hugely popular amongst recently enfranchised landed labourers who voted Liberal inspired by the promise of “three acres and a cow.” The programme was credited with securing the Liberal victory in that election and Chamberlain was made a cabinet minister by William Gladstone. Chamberlain broke with Gladstone over Home Rule for Ireland shortly after the election, a committed imperialist he believed the policy would lead to the collapse of the British Empire. Upon breaking with Gladstone he formed the Liberal Unionist Federation, a collection of anti-Home Rule Whigs and radicals. From 1886 the Liberal Unionists supported Lord Salisbury’s Conservative government, eventually the party would serve in coalition with the Tories from 1895-1906. Chamberlain served as Colonial Secretary where he unsuccessfully promoted the idea of an Imperial Federation. His time in office dimmed his radicalism as he became more indulgent in affairs of the Empire. Not being content with splitting the Liberals, Chamberlain did the same to the Tories in 1903 over tariff reform. His desire for “Imperial preference” in trade split the Conservative and Unionist coalition, resulting in the 1906 Liberal landslide. At the point when it looked like Chamberlain would capture control of the Tories (the Liberal Unionists had more or less become part and parcel of the Conservative Party) in 1906, he suffered a debilitating stroke-effectively ending his political career. Both his sons, Austen and Neville enjoyed successful political careers. Austen was denied the Premiership as he was too cautious in trying to avoid his father’s reputation as a splitter but did serve in several high offices, such as Foreign Secretary and Chancellor of the Exchequer. Neville entered politics late but managed to become Prime Minister, his time in that office was blighted by his association with the appeasement of Hitler.  

July282014
A young Tony Benn tries his hand at boxing, 1934.

A young Tony Benn tries his hand at boxing, 1934.

July262014

Ask Questions I'm bored

  • 1: Let’s start with a tricky one; what is the real reason you are confused right now?
  • 2: Do you ever get “good morning” texts from anyone?
  • 3: If your significant other smoked pot, would you care?
  • 4: Do you find it easy to trust others?
  • 5: What were you doing at 11PM last night?
  • 6: You’re drunk and lost walking down the road; who is with you?
  • 7: What would you do if you found out you had been cheated on?
  • 8: Are you close with your dad?
  • 9: I bet you kissed someone last night, right?
  • 10: What are you listening to?
  • 11: You can only drink ONE liquid for the rest of your life - what is it?
  • 12: Do you like hickeys?
  • 13: What time do you go to bed?
  • 14: Is there someone who continuously lets you down?
  • 15: Can you text as quickly with one hand as you do both?
  • 16: Do you always answer your texts?
  • 17: Do you hate the person you fell the hardest for?
  • 18: When was the last time you talked to one of your best friends?
  • 19: Is there someone that makes you happy every time you see them?
  • 20: What was your last thought before you went to bed last night?
  • 21: Is anyone else in the room with you?
  • 22: Do you believe what goes around comes around?
  • 23: Were you happier four months ago than you are now?
  • 24: Is there someone you wish you could fix things with?
  • 25: In the past week, have you cried?
  • 26: What colour is the shirt you are wearing?
  • 27: Do people ever call you by your last name?
  • 28: Is anyone ignoring you right now?
  • 29: Do you have a best friend?
  • 30: Would it be hard seeing someone else kiss the last person you kissed?
  • 31: Who was your last call/text message from?
  • 32: Are you mad at anyone?
  • 33: Have you ever kissed someone older than you?
  • 34: How old will the last person you kissed be on his/her next birthday?
  • 35: How many more days until your birthday?
  • 36: Do you have any summer plans yet?
  • 37: Do you have any good friends of the opposite sex?
  • 38: Are you keeping anything from your best friend(s) now?
  • 39: Do you have a secret that you’ve never told anyone?
  • 40: Have you ever regretted kissing someone?
  • 41: Do you think age matters in relationships?
  • 42: Are you available?
  • 43: How many people have you had real, strong feelings for since high school ended?
  • 44: If you had to get a piercing (not ears), what would you get?
  • 45: Do you believe exes can be friends?
  • 46: Do you regret anything?
  • 47: Honestly, what’s on your mind right now?
  • 48: Did you ever lose a best friend?
  • 49: Was your last kiss a mistake?
  • 50: Why aren’t you pursuing the person you like?
  • 51: Has the last person you kissed ever seen you cry?
  • 52: Do you still talk with the person you LAST kissed?
  • 53: What was the last thing you ate?
  • 54: Did you get any compliments today?
  • 55: Where are you going on your next vacation?
  • 56: Do you own anything from other countries?
  • 57: Are most of your friend guys or girls?
  • 58: Where have you lived most of your life?
  • 59: When was the last time you took a long drive?
  • 60: Have you ever played Spin the Bottle?
  • 61: Have you ever TPd someone’s house?
  • 62: Who do you text the most?
  • 63: What was the last movie you saw?
  • 64: What’s preventing your current boyfriend/girlfriend from going back to their ex?
  • 65: How many boyfriends/girlfriends did you have in 2011?
  • 66: Is the last person you kissed younger than you?
  • 67: Do you curse around your parents?
  • 68: Are you happy with where you live?
  • 69: Picture of yourself?
  • 70: Are you a monogamous person or do you believe in open-ended relationships?
  • 71: Have you ever been dumped?
  • 72: What do you most like about making out?
  • 73: Have you ever casually made out with someone who you weren’t seriously involved with?
  • 74: When you kiss someone for the first time, is it usually you who initiates it or the other?
  • 75: What part of a person’s body do you find most attractive?
  • 76: Who was the last person you talked to last night before you went to bed?
  • 77: Had sex with someone you knew less than an hour?
  • 78: Had sex with someone you didn’t know their name?
  • 79: What makes your heart flutter and brings a big cheesy smile to your face?
  • 80: Would you get involved with someone if they had a child already?
  • 81: Has someone who had a crush on you ever confessed to you?
  • 82: Do you tell a lot of people when you have a crush?
  • 83: Do you miss your last sweetie?
  • 84: Last time you slow danced with someone?
  • 85: Have you ever ‘dated’ someone you’ve never met?
  • 86: How can I win your heart?
  • 87: What is your astrological sign?
  • 88: What were you doing last night at 12 AM?
  • 89: Do you cook?
  • 90: Have you ever gotten back in touch with an old flame after a time of more than 3 months of no communication?
  • 91: If you’re single right now, do you wish you were in a relationship?
  • 92: Do you prefer to date various people or do you pretty much fall into monogamous relationships quickly?
  • 93: What physical traits do you look for in a potential interest?
  • 94: Name four things that you wish you had!
  • 95: Are you a player?
  • 96: Have you ever kissed 2 people in one day?
  • 97: Are you a tease?
  • 98: Ever meet anyone you met on Tumblr?
  • 99: Have you ever been deeply in love with someone?
  • 100: Anybody on Tumblr that you’d go on a date with?
  • 101: Hugs or Kisses?
  • 102: Are you too shy to ask someone out?
  • 103: The first thing you notice about the opposite sex?
  • 104: Is it cute when a boy/girl calls you babe?
  • 105: If a sexy person was pursuing you, but you knew he/she was in relationship, would you go for it?
  • 106: Do you flirt a lot?
  • 107: Your last kiss?
  • 108: Have you kissed more than 5 people since the start of 2012?
  • 109: Have you kissed anyone in the past month?
  • 110: If you could kiss anyone who would it be?
  • 111: Do you know who you’ll kiss next?
  • 112: Does someone like you currently?
  • 113: Do you currently have feelings for anyone?
  • 114: Do you like to be in serious relationships or just flings?
  • 115: Ever made out with just a friend?
  • 116: Are you happier single or in a relationship?
  • 117: Your own question that you want me to answer. Just write it.
7PM

bunniesandbeheadings:

Analysis of Robespierre’s Speech of 8 Thermidor by British Historian J.W Croker

image

The conflict [of Thermidor] began on the morning of the 8th Thermidor (26th July, 1794) by a long and elaborate speech from Robespierre, of which, as it does not appear in the Moniteur, and as it contains his own defence and his accusations against his antagonists, we think our readers will approve of our extracting some of the more important passages.

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